“Blue Hole Park” by Mike McConnell


Blue Hole” by Mike McConnell, 2019

“Blue Hole Park” is located in the rotunda of the new City of Georgetown City Hall. The digital mural was commissioned by the Georgetown Arts and Culture Board as part of the expanding public art program that incorporates public art into the design of public spaces. The mural spans a circumference of 88 feet and was inspired by photos of the San Gabriel River.

“The art installations are eye-catching with brilliant splashes of color. The whimsical depiction of Blue Hole Park by artist Mike McConnell immediately grabs one’s attention in the City Hall lobby rotunda. The circular panels are bold, colorful and modern representions of the flora
and fauna around and in the park.”  Ellen Greeney, Williamson County Sun

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“DayScape Wonder” by Kevin Greer

“Dayscape Wonder” by Kevin Greer, 2019

“DayScape Wonder” is located above the transaction window in the lobby of the new City of Georgetown Municipal Court building. The mosaic tile mural was commissioned by the Georgetown Arts and Culture Board as part of the expanding public art program that incorporates public art into the design of public spaces.

“Abstract painter Kevin Greer created bright orange and blue color-scapes for the Municipal Court transaction window. His artistry depicts the movement and energy within a day from sunrise to sunset and is intended to reflect the beauty and inspiration derived from the surrounding landscape.”  Ellen Greeney, Williamson County Sun

“El Arbol” (The Tree) by J. Muzacz

“El Arbol” (The Tree) by J. Muzacz, 2019

“El Arbol” (The Tree) by J. Muzacz is located in the lobby of the new City of Georgetown Municipal Court building.  The mosaic tile mural was commissioned by the Georgetown Arts and Culture Board as part of the expanding public art program that incorporates public art into the design of public spaces.

The El Árbol mosaic mural was inspired by a well-known vista from the Jim Hogg Campground at Lake Georgetown. The photographic reference was initially taken by Roger Engdahl as he and his wife camped there on a nationwide RV tour. After receiving permission to adapt his image for this mural, I digitally manipulated the landscape so that the pixels making up the image matched the 3/4 inch glass tiles you see in the mural and used that as reference while placing each square. The 50,000 unique glass pieces you see here represent the diversity of Georgetown and were sourced from suppliers all over the country – of Italian, Chinese and Mexican origin. The tiles were then hand-placed over a three-month period and installed using trade techniques.